Lexile analyzer: http://lexile.com/analyzer/
AR to Lexile these sites might help
http://north.salkeiz.k12.or.us/library/Library_Books/lexile_ar.pdf

this is a site that has a conversion chart as well as http://www.cpschools.com/Schools/HMS/SummerReading/LexileConversionChart.pdf


Lexile-to-Grade Correspondence
There is no direct correspondence between a specific Lexile measure and a specific grade level. Within any classroom or grade, there will be a range of readers and a range of reading materials. For example, in a fifth-grade classroom there will be some readers who are ahead of the typical reader (about 250L above) and some readers who are behind the typical reader (about 250L below). To say that some books are "just right" for fifth graders assumes that all fifth graders are reading at the same level. The Lexile® Framework for Reading is intended to match readers with texts at whatever level the reader is reading.

MetaMetrics® has studied the ranges of Lexile reader measures and Lexile text measures at specific grades in an effort to describe the typical Lexile measures of texts and the typical Lexile measures of students of a given grade level. This information is for descriptive purposes only and should not be interpreted as a prescribed guide about what an appropriate reader measure or text measure should be for a given grade.

The tables below show the middle 50% of reader measures and text measures for each grade. The middle 50% is called the interquartile range (IQR). The lower number in each range marks the 25th percentile of readers or texts and the higher number in each range marks the 75th percentile of readers or texts. It is important to note that 25% of students and texts in the studies had measures below the lower number and 25% had measures above the higher number. Data for the reader measures came from a national sample of students.

Typical Reader Measures, by Grade
Grade Reader Measures, Mid-Year
25th percentile to 75th percentile (IQR)
1 Up to 300L
2 140L to 500L
3 330L to 700L
4 445L to 810L
5 565L to 910L
6 665L to 1000L
7 735L to 1065L
8 805L to 1100L
9 855L to 1165L
10 905L to 1195L
11 and 12 940L to 1210L



Data for the first column of text measures came from a research study designed to examine collections of textbooks designated for specific grades (MetaMetrics, 2009). The "stretch" text measures (defined in 2012 through studies related to the development of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts) in the second column represent the demand of text that students should be reading to be college and career ready by the end of Grade 12.

Typical Text Measures, by Grade
Grade
Text Demand Study 2009
25th percentile to 75th percentile (IQR)
2012 CCSS Text Measures*

1 230L to 420L 190L to 530L
2 450L to 570L 420L to 650L
3 600L to 730L 520L to 820L
4 640L to780L 740L to 940L
5 730L to 850L 830L to 1010L
6 860L to 920L 925L to 1070L
7 880L to 960L 970L to 1120L
8 900L to 1010L 1010L to 1185L
9 960L to 1110L 1050L to 1260L
10 920L to 1120L 1080L to 1335L
11 and 12 1070L to 1220L 1185L to 1385L


*COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS FOR ENGLISH, LANGUAGE ARTS, APPENDIX A (ADDITIONAL INFORMATION), NGA AND CCSSO, 2012

New research released August 15 on text complexity. The updates refer to the three-part model defined in Appendix A of the the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects, which combines the quantitative and qualitative measures of text complexity with reader and task considerations. The goal of the quantitative study was to provide information regarding the variety of ways text complexity can be measured quantitatively and to examine text complexity tools that are valid, transparent, user friendly, and reliable. We continue to update our tools to be aligned to the CCSS. Most recently, we updated the Lexile Map to include CCSS text exaemplars and the new CCSS ranges.

Notice that there is considerable overlap between the grades. This is typical of student reading levels and texts published for each grade. In addition, the level of support provided during reading and reader motivation have an impact on the reading experience. Students who are interested in reading about a specific topic (and are therefore motivated) often are able to read text at a higher level than would be forecasted by the reader's Lexile measure.

Although a student may be an excellent reader, it is incorrect to assume that he or she will comprehend text typically found at (and intended for) a higher grade level. A high Lexile measure for a student in one grade indicates that the student can read grade-level-appropriate materials at a very high comprehension rate. The student may not have the background knowledge or maturity to understand material written for an older audience. It is always necessary to preview materials prior to selecting them for a student.

It is important to note that the Lexile measure of a book refers to its text difficulty only. A Lexile measure does not address the content or quality of the book. Lexile measures are based on two well-established predictors of how difficult a text is to comprehend: word frequency and sentence length. Many other factors affect the relationship between a reader and a book, including its content, the age and interests of the reader, and the design of the actual book. The Lexile measure is a good starting point in your book-selection process, but you should always consider these other factors when making a decision about which book to choose.

The real power of The Lexile Framework is in matching readers to text-no matter where the reader is in the development of his or her reading skills-and in examining reader growth. When teachers know Lexile reader measures and Lexile text measures, they can match their students with the texts that will maximize learning and growth.




Parcc has released sample test items: http://www.parcconline.org/samples/item-task-prototypes

Author Carla McClafferty talks about her works and Common Core in this YouTube Video: http://youtu.be/G5URQGDF5i8

Complexity of text required by Common Core http://commoncorestandards.com/ela/how-complex-is-complex-raising-text-complexity-a-grade-level/

http://www.parcconline.org/technology



Lesson plan fill in sheet (Toolbox checklist for lesson plans):

Links to common core informational texts by grade: http://resourcesforhistoryteachers.wikispaces.com/Primary+Sources

Teresa Chance from Rogers - website of common core implementation http://web.me.com/acaciatc/UACC/Intro.html

Cassandra Barnett's wiki with Common core Crosswalk and NYC units links: http://schoollibraryshare.wikispaces.com

Lexile info:
Lexile converter pdf-
The text complexity issue is sure to be a challenge to some educators as we implement CCSS. Please keep in mind that it is only one tool used to consider text complexity and PARCC is even considering developing their own tool to measure text complexity. The Lexile is only the quantitative part of the triangle. You also have to consider qualitative analysis and teacher’s input judging the reader and task. Many stories are easy to read (Lexile)but may have deeper levels of meaning (qualitative). Some content may be for mature readers (Reader and Task).

Lexiles are only one part of the equation. Lexiles are a measure of text complexity
• Established through an algorithm
• Considers sentence length
• Word frequency
• Danger: Does not consider age appropriateness
• Adult novels can be in grade 2-3 Lexile range

NOTE: Lord of the Flies has a lexile of 770 (Gr. 4-5); however, it is NOT age/grade appropriate for 4th or 5th grade students.

There are three 3 components to text complexity. All three are equally important when trying to determine the complexity and grade appropriateness of reading material. The librarian or media specialist at most schools can be instrumental in assisting teachers in determining text complexity.

Here are some things that might help this educator clarify her understanding of Text Complexity……

Appendix A of the Common Core State Standards explains that there are three considerations for text complexity: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Reader and Task. Lexile is a type of quantitative measure. Appendix B of the Common Core State Standards includes exemplars that are measured using all three types of criteria, not just Lexile. If texts are selected using only the Quantitative measure, it is possible that inappropriate texts could be assigned to students. For example, Water for Elephants scores 730 using Lexile measures. The content of Water for Elephants is not appropriate for 4th-5th grade students. There are times when the content of a text is appropriate for older students but the Lexile is lower. Other times the Lexile level might extend slightly above the students' grade level, but the content is so engaging that students persist in reading the difficult portions with great enthusiasm. Note: If the Lexile is too challenging, it will frustrate the students and they will not be able to read the text. It is crucial to use all three measures when determining appropriate text complexity.

Lexile is a great tool when used in conjunction with the Qualitative and Reader and Task considerations as explained in Appendix A of the Common Core State Standards.




The Lexile is only the quantitative part of the triangle. You also have to consider qualitative analysis and teacher’s input judging the reader and task. Many stories are easy to read (Lexile)but may have deeper levels of meaning (qualitative). Some content may be for mature readers (Reader and Task).

Lexiles are only one part of the equation. Lexiles are a measure of text complexity
• Established through an algorithm
• Considers sentence length
• Word frequency
• Danger: Does not consider age appropriateness
• Adult novels can be in grade 2-3 Lexile range

NOTE: Lord of the Flies has a lexile of 770 (Gr. 4-5); however, it is NOT age/grade appropriate for 4th or 5th grade students.

There are three 3 components to text complexity. All three are equally important when trying to determine the complexity and grade appropriateness of reading material. The librarian or media specialist at most schools can be instrumental in assisting teachers in determining text complexity.

Here are some things that might help this educator clarify her understanding of Text Complexity……

Appendix A of the Common Core State Standards explains that there are three considerations for text complexity: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Reader and Task. Lexile is a type of quantitative measure. Appendix B of the Common Core State Standards includes exemplars that are measured using all three types of criteria, not just Lexile. If texts are selected using only the Quantitative measure, it is possible that inappropriate texts could be assigned to students. For example, Water for Elephants scores 730 using Lexile measures. The content of Water for Elephants is not appropriate for 4th-5th grade students. There are times when the content of a text is appropriate for older students but the Lexile is lower. Other times the Lexile level might extend slightly above the students' grade level, but the content is so engaging that students persist in reading the difficult portions with great enthusiasm. Note: If the Lexile is too challenging, it will frustrate the students and they will not be able to read the text. It is crucial to use all three measures when determining appropriate text complexity.

Lexile is a great tool when used in conjunction with the Qualitative and Reader and Task considerations as explained in Appendix A of the Common Core State Standards.

http://arkansasideas.com/commoncore
This is the Common Core State Standards site developed by ADE and AETN. This site is designed to house the video resources to support educators in Arkansas during the implementation of CCSS.
All past professional development offerings (math, instructional leadership, Institutes) are found on this site, as well as information about upcoming opportunities and the
Strategic Plan.

http://www.commoncorearkansas.org/
This is the ADE CCSS microsite. Here, you will find resources for educators, parents, and community members, as well as the video that features Governor Beebe, Commissioner Kimbrell, and others.

http://ccssarkansas.pbworks.com/
This is the ADE Common Core Wiki homepage. The crosswalks, timeline for implementation, and the most up-to-date version of "What Every Arkansas Educator Needs to Know About Common Core State Standards" is always found here! Links to the content area wikis are also found here!

http://adesecondarymath.pbworks.com/
This page houses past emails from the CCSS ListServ, in case you recently joined or missed previous blasts sent out! Go to the right of the page and look under CCSS Comm. Files.





Who is Responsible for what in Common Core Standards Link: http://ideas.aetn.org/commoncore/strategic-plan

Evals for teachers:
If you don’t have Charlotte Danielson’s book, Enhancing Professional Practice, the domains for LMS evaluation listed on this pdf document are taken directly from her book. Her book is the model Arkansas is using for teacher (and Librarian) evaluation. Her book is $27.95 and would be good to add to your professional collection.
Until you get her book, print out the last 8 pages of this pdf to see her rubric for LMS, which is how you will be evaluated in the future.

http://sau9.org/SAU9/Forms/Eval/CALMSE_Prof_Eval_System2011.pdf


ADE Director's Memo that states LMS are valuable to help schools with common core: http://adesharepoint2.arkansas.gov/memos/Lists/Approved%20Memos/DispForm2.aspx?ID=514

What every educator needs to know about common core state standards.
http://commoncore.aetn.org/strategic-plan/CCSS%20Information%20and%20Resources%20Guide.pdf

http://www.commoncorearkansas.org/

State emails archive regarding Common Core
http://adesecondarymath.pbworks.com/w/page/46711781/CCSS%20communication%20from%20ADE%20for%20Content%20Leads

Common Core Institute Volume 1
http://vimeo.com/arkansasideas/review/33403437/0b2d62f23a


Sample lessons from PARCC on King's Letter from the Birmingham Jai (6 day lesson) and Gettysburg address (3 day lesson):
video feed---http://vimeo.com/25206110

You Tube Video of history and key terms of Common Core from Huntington Institute: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxefsLG2eps&safety_mode=true&persist_safety_mode=1

https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos?categories=topics_common-core




These PARCC Content Frameworks for ELA and math were just released yesterday to be used with Common Core. There are lots of references to research and technology skills that librarians will have to help with. Share with your teachers and librarians.

http://www.parcconline.org/sites/parcc/files/PARCC%20MCF%20for%20ELA%20Literacy_Fall%202011%20Release.pdf
http://www.parcconline.org/parcc-content-frameworks


ADE has done some videos on Common Core:
http://itunes.apple.com/itunes-u/common-core-arkansas/id473223284
Gathering Momentum for Algebra
Literary Non-Fiction in Grades 6-12: Opening New Worlds for Teachers and Students
Literary Nonfiction in the Classroom: Opening New Worlds for Students
Shifts in Math Practice: The Balance Between Skills and Understanding
Ratio and Proportion in Grades 6-8: Connections to College and Career Skills
Text-Dependent Analysis in Action: Examples from Dr. MLK, Jr.’s Letter from a Birmingham Jail
Speaking and Listening: The Key Role of Evidence
Mathematics Fluency: A Balanced Approach

Live Binder on Common Core:http://livebinders.com/play/play/94511

Common Core Powerpoint from ADE:
From author/writer Darcy Pattison of LR:For convenience, I've collected a series of videos about CCSS and posted them on one page. http://commoncorestandards.com/ela/15-part-video-series-ccss/
Produced in partnership with NYS PBS stations WCNY/Syracuse and WNET/New York City, this series of videos illuminates the Common Core through conversations between NYS Commissioner of Education John King, a former high school social studies teacher and middle school principal; David Coleman, a contributing author of the Common Core State Standards; and Gerson, a Senior Fellow with the USNY Regents Research Fund and a former high school English teacher and principal.
This includes 3 hours and 49 minutes of video explaining the Common Core Standards from the POV of those who helped write the documents and includes videos on both Math and ELA.
Darcy's page is www.darcypattison.com

Common Core for beginners: http://ccssarkansas.pbworks.com/w/page/41448809/ADE-Common-Core-State-Standards-(CCSS)-Wiki-

Common Core has Libraries collaborating to insure standards are reached. We will have to restock our nonfiction now as they are calling for the use of primary source documents and nonfiction books for the kids to read. Also the Basic plus website does not have all of the upper grades books listed. Remember the lists are just suggested lists.
The actual Common Core Standards website: http://www.corestandards.org/
There are two sources for lists: one from the Common Core document—Appendix A and one from the Bill Gates- funded Common Core Curriculum Maps. The Curriculum Maps outline six units for each grade level, and each unit has a resource list.

http://www.corestandards.org/the-standards/english-language-arts-standards/standard-10-range-quality-and-complexity/texts-illustrating-the-complexity-quality-and-range-of-student-reading-k5/
http://commoncore.org/maps/index.php/maps/

- the CC Assessment examples: http://parcconline.org/
Lori and Jill's wonderful elementary CC wiki: http://ccslittech.wikispaces.com/
Traci Tate's great Elem Math modules for CC: http://mathandtechnologyinelementary.wikispaces.com/
Web Page with everything to help implement, used by the Coops: http://web.me.com/acaciatc/UACC/Intro.html

From Darcy Pattison: http://commoncorestandards.com/EvaluateTextsCCSS.pdf
Darcy has put together a one-page, at-a-glance summary of the requirements
for evaluating texts for CCSS. According to the Appendix A, there are
three equally important criteria: qualitative, quantative and reader &
task. This one-page document puts all the criteria into a simple tool.
You can download it from above link.

Lexile info
Lexile for individual books can be looked up at: http://www.lexile.com/fab/

Several of the vendors I use include the Lexile in the MARC records. Additionally, services like Mitinet http://www.mitinet.com will update all your records with that information (and other fixes) for a fee. I’ve used their service and have appreciated the clean-up it will do in a library catalog.

reading interest inventory for middle school by j Dowdle:

These are the responses I received concerning assessment of lexile levels:
Scholastic has a software program, like Star Reader, that measures lexiles, called Scholastic Reading Inventory. That is the only program I know that has lexiles. It is software and not free, but also there has been a paper and pencil version, also not free. Also, most standardized testing, like the ITBS, is supposed to proved the lexiles along with the indiviual student's test scores.. I didn't check this year's scores, but we have been getting lexiles with SAT-10 and ITBS in the past. You can check a book's level for free on www.lexile.com.
Our state chose not to pay the extra $1 per child to have students’ lexile levels included in the testing data.

http://www.lexile.com/findabook/ The validity of the assessment attached to this link is questionable, but aren’t most of them questionable? It only takes a few seconds but does give students a place to start with Lexile numbers plus examples of books.

A list of assessments and reading programs that utilize the Lexile scale to report Lexile measures can be found on the following Lexile.com pages:
State Assessments
(http://www.lexile.com/about-lexile/How-to-get-lexile-measures/states/);
Norm-Referenced & Interim/Benchmark Assessments (http://www.lexile.com/about-lexile/How-to-get-lexile-measures/norm-formative/);
Spanish Assessments
(http://www.lexile.com/about-lexile/How-to-get-lexile-measures/spanish-assessments/);
International Assessments
(http://www.lexile.com/about-lexile/How-to-get-lexile-measures/international-assessments/);
and Reading Programs
(http://www.lexile.com/about-lexile/How-to-get-lexile-measures/readingprograms/).

None of the above links contain anything that is free or cheap.

EXTRA INFO
Frediie Hiebert, said at ARA that ANY reading level program can be used with Common Core, not just lexiles. They said that they cannot require us to use lexiles, unless they give us the money for the program. So Star reader, if you have it, can be used, as long as you can determine reading levels and determine growth. Star uses ATOS.



Here is a list of titles suggested by ADE:
http://arkansased.org/educators/pdf/curriculum/ccss_english_021511.pdf
http://arkansased.org/educators/pdf/curriculum/ccss_math_021511.pdf
http://www.corestandards.org/the-standards/english-language-arts-standards/standard-10-range-quality-and-complexity-6-12/texts-illustrating-the-complexity-quality-and-range-of-student-reading-6-12/
Here is a list suggested by Follett:
http://titlewave.com/list?SID=448b4b944599b7a3fdba6ecd21429a77

Elementary: http://commoncore.org/maps/index.php/print/elementary
Middle: http://commoncore.org/maps/index.php/print/middle
High: http://commoncore.org/maps/index.php/print/high
CoreStandards.org is the organization that initiated this push toward standards and their standards are what ADE has adopted. The Appendix B lists "exemplar texts" and explains how to evaluate other possible texts. I checked with Dana Breitsweiler at the ADE this week to ask if the Exemplar texts were required or recommended. As of now, her knowledge is that they are what the document states, exemplar texts. As the Core Standards are implemented, the ADE or local districts may "require" them, but that isn't the case, as of now.

CommonCore.org is an organization partly funded by the the Bill Gates Foundation. They have written suggested curriculum maps based on the standards. They state: "The maps do not comprise a complete curriculum, nor do they prescribe how teachers are to teach the material included in the maps. The maps are curriculum planning documents that teachers can use as a resource for making their own more detailed curricula and lesson plans." They state that the curriculum maps use most of the exemplar texts, but takes an additional interesting step. Authors with texts on the list are referred to as "exemplar authors" and other books by them are suggested. As of now, these curriculum maps are not required, but the ADE is aware of them and does mention them at times in their information.
Lists from other sources:













Shirley Fetherolf ADE:
They are exemplary titles, not required titles. It would be good to track down any that you have already and make sure they don’t get weeded by mistake. Some big vendors like Follett and Permabound have lists of these titles, so you could look them up and read the summaries if you weren’t familiar with them. The current thinking seems to be to get the exemplary titles if you don’t have them. Since they are older copyright dates, you might find used copies on Amazon or similar Web sites.
http://www.corestandards.org/the-standards/english-language-arts-standards/standard-10-range-quality-and-complexity/texts-illustrating-the-complexity-quality-and-range-of-student-reading-k5/
http://commoncore.org/maps/index.php/maps/
Here is a link to Shirley's wiki which has even more Common Core information and is frequently updated: http://hoorayforbooks.pbworks.com/w/page/31964772/Common-Core-State-Standards-(CCSS)


Perma-Bound:
Listed on Perma-Bound's website, www.perma-bound.com is a correlation by grade level and by each individual standard, a list of books which can be viewed and copied by each standard or by each grade. The correlation for Language Arts and Math is complete. Loyd Harris and I also have certain lists in hard copy that can be emailed, faxed, or mailed. Please let us know how we can assist you.
Cora

Loyd Harris/Cora Ellsworth
Perma-Bound Books
P.O. Box 784
Jacksonville, AR 72078
Phone 1-800-982-5390
Fax 1-800-982-6977
harris599@comcast.net

Here are some Common Core Resources:


1. Links to Free First Edition Curriculum Maps from CommonCore.org
CommonCore.org has moved it’s First Edition curriculum maps to a new location, in favor of the Second Edition, for which they now charge. You can still find the original maps for free here: http://commoncorestandards.com/ela/k-12-curriculum-maps/
2. Both Lexile and ATOS (Renaissance Learning’s or Accelerated Reader’s measure of readability) protest that you can’t compare the two reading levels because they are designed to measure slightly different things. Yet, ATOS provided me with this pdf that converts their scores to a 2000-based score which they say “roughly” translates to Lexile. In other words, if you know an ATOS rating, you can estimate the Lexile from this. Still, in practical terms, an internet search on the book’s title is likely to turn up both scores.
Download the ATOS-2000 scale converter here.
http://commoncorestandards.com/wp-content/uploads/ATOSLexileConverter.pdf
3. The Common Core standards emphasize three criteria for evaluating a text: Quantitative (Lexile score), Qualitative and Reader/Task. Here is a one-page summary of the criteria that makes it easy to justify to administrators/teachers why a book is appropriate for a certain lesson. Download the Evaluating Texts for Common Core tool here.
http://www.commoncorestandards.com/CCSSTexts237159.pdf
4. FAQ: List of Common Core Required Texts:
http://commoncorestandards.com/?p=252
Darcy

--
www.darcypattison.com
www.facebook.com/DarcyPattisonAuthor
PRAIRIE STORMS, August 2011
See the trailer: youtube.com/DarcyPattison